Now Playing Tracks

thegreenwolf:

greenteablacklips:

Review: Portland Black Lipstick Company

Anyone who went through a babybat phase knows the horrors of costume makeup. Black lipstick in particular is something that’s easy to come by in the Halloween section of the local drugstore. You know the one. Cheap, greasy, lasts about five minutes before melting off your face? Yeah we’ve all been there. Let’s try not to think about it anymore. For a while now I’ve been on the hunt for a perfect grown up black lipstick. “Perfect” meaning it must meet the following requirements:

1. Affordable—there are some higher end black lipcolors out there that get great reviews, but frankly I can’t spend thirty bucks on a lipstick. I have bills to pay, and booze to buy.

2. Opaque—a lot of the cheaper stuff is very sheer. I wanted maximum coverage.

3. True black—not a dark purple or blue like cheaper lipsticks

4. Long lasting—something I can wear all day, every day without having to touch it up often.

After a bit of searching and reading other reviews online, I finally found my perfect match at Portland Black Lipstick Company, a small indie cosmetics company based in (duh) Portland, Oregon. The fact that their products are independently and ethically produced is a bonus on top of meeting all four of my criteria. I bought their Original Black Lipstick back in September, and it’s been my absolute favorite lip color ever since.

At nine dollars plus shipping, it’s way too affordable not to try. Because it’s so inexpensive I had some doubts about it’s quality, but I was pleasantly surprised. You get much more than you pay for here. The photos above were taken after one swipe, and you can see that the color and the coverage is excellent. It has exactly the sort of black leather look I wanted. And it really does last all day! I wear it to work almost every day now and other than touching up after eating, I hardly need to worry about it at all.

The only drawback I can find is that the lip balm style tube it comes in can make application a little messy, but if you’re careful (or use a lip brush) it’s no biggie. Only a small flaw in an otherwise excellent product.

I highly recommend it to anyone looking for a very affordable, high quality black lipstick. They have lots of other interesting colors that I see myself trying in the future. I’ll be sure to post more photos when I do.

I know the lady behind this one-woman business, and have talked a good bit with her about her work. She’s recreating Victorian cosmetics using original recipes, and considering all the petrochemical-based stuff available on the mainstream market, her creations are a nice alternative for those of us concerned with the environment and what we put on and in our own bodies.

youknownothingmomsnow

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

i have this problem big time. :/ and even though my bf has told me to stop..i find i cant help it, and i am super humble! so it sucks!

i think i have tons of good and bad work! :/

We make Tumblr themes